Month: December 2017

God vs. G-d

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I’ve noticed since I’ve been in Israel that Jews avoid saying or writing the name of God. They call him HaShem (the name) or Elohim. When writing in Hebrew, they use השם, אלהים. In English, G-d. I understand that they do this out of respect. However, I have a different way of showing respect. First of all, I don’t shy away from using God’s many names in praise and worship. Second of all, I capitalize pronouns related to God. For example, He, Him, You, Who. I do this as a way of setting Him apart and showing respect. You may think that both the Jewish and Christian way of saying and writing God’s name are correct. However, I find the Jewish way offensive. Consider how curse words are censored. Symbols are used in place of letters in an attempt to make the word more appropriate. Why would anyone censor God’s name the way cuss words are censored? Since when is censoring showing respect for the word? Additionally, people use words in place of cuss words so they don’t seem as bad. Some people argue that using these words is as bad as cursing because they use them to have the same meaning as the curse words. Thus, how is saying HaShem different from saying God, when you are referring to God? Conversely, capitalization is a sign of respect. Important words are often capitalized for emphasis and out of reverence. Capital pronouns were even used for royalty. Also, saying God’s name is a form of praise and worship, not blasphemy and disrespect. One way I show respect for God is by using His many names when I sing to Him. In doing so, I am recognizing His sovereignty and His character. In conclusion, why would anyone treat God’s good name like a bad word? Like good words, God’s name should be used and glorified.

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